Menu

My Burncoose

Search

0

Basket

Stewartia - Growing Guide

Characteristics

This genus of evergreen and deciduous trees from the USA, China and Japan is related to Camellia. Stewartia flowers have great merit in woodland gardens because their white, camellia-like blooms appear in June, July and August when little else is out.

Most species of stewartias also have attractive peeling bark which provides colour and interest right through the year. The autumn colours on S. rostrata (near black) and S. monodelpha (red-brown) particularly are another useful attribute.

Stewartias are relatively unknown in UK gardens compared to other summer flowering trees such as eucryphia. However they well deserve to be more widely grown and appreciated and are not difficult small trees to grow.

Stewartia  serrata    click for larger image
Stewartia serrata
Stewartia  serrata    click for larger image
Stewartia serrata
Stewartia  pteropetiolata    click for larger image
Stewartia pteropetiolata

Location and preferences

Stewartias enjoy moist but well drained soils which are moderately fertile and humus rich.

Neutral to acid soil is required and full sun or dappled shade is fine with some shelter from strong winds.

In smaller gardens they are, perhaps, an interesting alternative as a smaller growing tree to acers or cherries.

Stewartias dislike being transplanted and require no pruning.

There are no specific pests and diseases and stewartias are trouble free. S. pteropetiolata, which is evergreen, is the only tenderish species.

Stewartia  henryae    click for larger image
Stewartia henryae
Stewartia  henryae    click for larger image
Stewartia henryae
Stewartia  henryae    click for larger image
Stewartia henryae

Propagation

Stewartias produce woody ovoid capsules of seeds each of which has five seed chambers containing up to four seeds.

These can be readily removed by hand from their capsules when ripe in the autumn. They can then be sown immediately in pots or containers and overwintered in a cold frame. They will germinate readily in the following spring.

Stewartias can be grown from softwood new growth cuttings in mid summer. As with many small trees, rooting the cuttings is one thing but successfully overwintering them quite another. Alternatively, cuttings can be tried from ripened wood in late summer and inserted directly in sandy soil under a cloche or in a cold frame.

Seeds are easier!

See our detailed article on collecting, storing and planting seeds.


Our best two to grow

Our choice of the two best stewartia species to grow:

Stewartia pseudocamellia – attractive peeling pink to green and red-brown to grey bark. Rose-like cup shaped white flowers.

Stewartia  pseudocamellia    click for larger image
Stewartia pseudocamellia
Stewartia  pseudocamellia    click for larger image
Stewartia pseudocamellia

Stewartia rostrata – large flowers which are pinkish in bud opening white with odd pink blotches. Dramatic dark autumn colour which can start to develop in August after a hot summer.

Stewartia  rostrata    click for larger image
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia  rostrata    click for larger image
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia  rostrata    click for larger image
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia  rostrata    click for larger image
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia  rostrata    click for larger image
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia  rostrata    click for larger image
Stewartia rostrata

Plants


Visit the Caerhays Castle website
Visit Burncoose House - Holiday Accommodation
Order the 2019 Burncoose Catalogue
Payment methods accepted
watch us on you tube

Burncoose Nurseries: Gwennap, Redruth, Cornwall TR16 6BJ
Telephone: +44 (0) 1209 860316 Fax: +44 (0) 1209 860011 Email: info@burncoose.co.uk
© Burncoose Nurseries 1997 - 2019      Website by Forgecom